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Resources

1

Category: Marketplace
Easy-to-deploy and automatically configured third-party applications, including single virtual machine or multiple virtual machine solutions.
References:
[AWS]:AWS Marketplace
[Azure]:Azure Marketplace
[Google]:Google Cloud Marketplace
Tags: #AWSMarketplace, #AzureMarketPlace, #GoogleMarketplace
Differences: They are both digital catalog with thousands of software listings from independent software vendors that make it easy to find, test, buy, and deploy software that runs on their respective cloud platform.

2

Category: AI and machine learning
A cloud service to train, deploy, automate, and manage machine learning models.
References:
[AWS]:AWS SageMaker(build, train and deploy machine learning models), AWS DeepComposer (ML enabled musical keyboard), Amazon Fraud Detector (Detect more online fraud faster), Amazon CodeGuru (Automate code reviews and identify expensive lines of code), Contact Lens for Amazon Connect (Contact center analytics powered by ML), Amazon Kendra (Reinvent enterprise search with ML), Amazon Augmented AI (Easily implement human review of ML predictions), Amazon SageMaker Studio (The first visual IDE for machine learning), Amazon SageMaker Notebooks (Quickly start and share ML notebooks), Amazon SageMaker Experiments (Organize, track, and evaluate ML experiments), Amazon SageMaker Debugger (Analyze and debug ML models in real time), Amazon SageMaker Autopilot (Automatically create high quality ML models), Amazon SageMaker Model Monitor (Continuously monitor ML models)
[Azure]:Azure Machine Learning
[Google]:Google Cloud TensorFlow
Tags: #AI, #CloudAI, #SageMaker, #AzureMachineLearning, #TensorFlow
Differences: According to the StackShare community, Azure Machine Learning has a broader approval, being mentioned in 12 company stacks & 8 developers stacks; compared to Amazon Machine Learning, which is listed in 8 company stacks and 9 developer stacks.

3

Category: AI and machine learning
Build and connect intelligent bots that interact with your users using text/SMS, Skype, Teams, Slack, Office 365 mail, Twitter, and other popular services.
References:
[AWS]:Alexa Skills Kit (enables a developer to build skills, also called conversational applications, on the Amazon Alexa artificial intelligence assistant.)
[Azure]:Microsoft Bot Framework (building enterprise-grade conversational AI experiences.)
[Google]:Google Assistant Actions ( developer platform that lets you create software to extend the functionality of the Google Assistant, Google's virtual personal assistant,)

Tags: #AlexaSkillsKit, #MicrosoftBotFramework, #GoogleAssistant
Differences: One major advantage Google gets over Alexa is that Google Assistant is available to almost all Android devices.

4

Category: AI and machine learning
Description:API capable of converting speech to text, understanding intent, and converting text back to speech for natural responsiveness.
References:
[AWS]:Amazon Lex (building conversational interfaces into any application using voice and text.)
[Azure]:Azure Speech Services(unification of speech-to-text, text-to-speech, and speech translation into a single Azure subscription)
[Google]:Google APi.ai, AI Hub (Hosted repo of plug-and-play AI component), AI building blocks(for developers to add sight, language, conversation, and structured data to their applications.), AI Platform(code-based data science development environment, lets ML developers and data scientists quickly take projects from ideation to deployment.), DialogFlow (Google-owned developer of human–computer interaction technologies based on natural language conversations. ), TensorFlow(Open Source Machine Learning platform)

Tags: #AmazonLex, #CogintiveServices, #AzureSpeech, #Api.ai, #DialogFlow, #Tensorflow
Differences: api.ai provides us with such a platform which is easy to learn and comprehensive to develop conversation actions. It is a good example of the simplistic approach to solving complex man to machine communication problem using natural language processing in proximity to machine learning. Api.ai supports context based conversations now, which reduces the overhead of handling user context in session parameters. On the other hand in Lex this has to be handled in session. Also, api.ai can be used for both voice and text based conversations (assistant actions can be easily created using api.ai).

5

Category: AI and machine learning
Description:Computer Vision: Extract information from images to categorize and process visual data.
References:
[AWS]:Amazon Rekognition (based on the same proven, highly scalable, deep learning technology developed by Amazon’s computer vision scientists to analyze billions of images and videos daily. It requires no machine learning expertise to use.)
[Azure]:Cognitive Services(bring AI within reach of every developer—without requiring machine-learning expertise.)
[Google]:Google Vision (offers powerful pre-trained machine learning models through REST and RPC APIs.)
Tags: AmazonRekognition, #GoogleVision, #AzureSpeech
Differences: For now, only Google Cloud Vision supports batch processing. Videos are not natively supported by Google Cloud Vision or Amazon Rekognition. The Object Detection functionality of Google Cloud Vision and Amazon Rekognition is almost identical, both syntactically and semantically.
Differences:
Google Cloud Vision and Amazon Rekognition offer a broad spectrum of solutions, some of which are comparable in terms of functional details, quality, performance, and costs.

7

Category: Big data and analytics: Data warehouse
Description: Apache Spark-based analytics platform. Managed Hadoop service. Data orchestration, ETL, Analytics and visualization
References:
[AWS]:EMR, Data Pipeline, Kinesis Stream, Kinesis Firehose, Glue, QuickSight, Athena, CloudSearch
[Azure]:Azure Databricks, Data Catalog Cortana Intelligence, HDInsight, Power BI, Azure Datafactory, Azure Search, Azure Data Lake Anlytics, Stream Analytics, Azure Machine Learning
[Google]:Cloud DataProc, Machine Learning, Cloud Datalab
Tags:#EMR, #DataPipeline, #Kinesis, #Cortana, AzureDatafactory, #AzureDataAnlytics, #CloudDataProc, #MachineLearning, #CloudDatalab
Differences: All three providers offer similar building blocks; data processing, data orchestration, streaming analytics, machine learning and visualisations. AWS certainly has all the bases covered with a solid set of products that will meet most needs. Azure offers a comprehensive and impressive suite of managed analytical products. They support open source big data solutions alongside new serverless analytical products such as Data Lake. Google provide their own twist to cloud analytics with their range of services. With Dataproc and Dataflow, Google have a strong core to their proposition. Tensorflow has been getting a lot of attention recently and there will be many who will be keen to see Machine Learning come out of preview.

8

Category: Virtual servers
Description:Virtual servers allow users to deploy, manage, and maintain OS and server software. Instance types provide combinations of CPU/RAM. Users pay for what they use with the flexibility to change sizes.
Batch: Run large-scale parallel and high-performance computing applications efficiently in the cloud.
References:
[AWS]:Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), Amazon Bracket(Explore and experiment with quantum computing), Amazon Ec2 M6g Instances (Achieve up to 40% better price performance), Amazon Ec2 Inf1 instancs (Deliver cost-effective ML inference), AWS Graviton2 Processors (Optimize price performance for cloud workloads), AWS Batch, AWS AutoScaling, VMware Cloud on AWS, AWS Local Zones (Run low latency applications at the edge), AWS Wavelength (Deliver ultra-low latency applications for 5G devices), AWS Nitro Enclaves (Further protect highly sensitive data), AWS Outposts (Run AWS infrastructure and services on-premises)
[Azure]:Azure Virtual Machines, Azure Batch, Virtual Machine Scale Sets, Azure VMware by CloudSimple
[Google]:Compute Engine, Preemptible Virtual Machines, Managed instance groups (MIGs), Google Cloud VMware Solution by CloudSimple
Tags: #AWSEC2, #AWSBatch, #AWSAutoscaling, #AzureVirtualMachine, #AzureBatch, #VirtualMachineScaleSets, #AzureVMWare, #ComputeEngine, #MIGS, #VMWare
Differences: There is very little to choose between the 3 providers when it comes to virtual servers. Amazon has some impressive high end kit, on the face of it this sound like it would make AWS a clear winner. However, if your only option is to choose the biggest box available you will need to make sure you have very deep pockets, and perhaps your money may be better spent re-architecting your apps for horizontal scale.Azure’s remains very strong in the PaaS space and now has a IaaS that can genuinely compete with AWS
Google offers a simple and very capable set of services that are easy to understand. However, with availability in only 5 regions it does not have the coverage of the other players.

9

Category: Containers and container orchestrators
Description: A container is a standard unit of software that packages up code and all its dependencies so the application runs quickly and reliably from one computing environment to another.
Container orchestration is all about managing the lifecycles of containers, especially in large, dynamic environments.
References:
[AWS]:EC2 Container Service (ECS), Fargate(Run containers without anaging servers or clusters), EC2 Container Registry(managed AWS Docker registry service that is secure, scalable, and reliable.), Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes (EKS: runs the Kubernetes management infrastructure across multiple AWS Availability Zones), App Mesh( application-level networking to make it easy for your services to communicate with each other across multiple types of compute infrastructure)
[Azure]:Azure Container Instances, Azure Container Registry, Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS), Service Fabric Mesh
[Google]:Google Container Engine, Container Registry, Kubernetes Engine
Tags:#ECS, #Fargate, #EKS, #AppMesh, #ContainerEngine, #ContainerRegistry, #AKS
Differences: Google Container Engine, AWS Container Services, and Azure Container Instances can be used to run docker containers. Google offers a simple and very capable set of services that are easy to understand. However, with availability in only 5 regions it does not have the coverage of the other players.

10

Category: Serverless
Description: Integrate systems and run backend processes in response to events or schedules without provisioning or managing servers.
References:
[AWS]:AWS Lambda
[Azure]:Azure Functions
[Google]:Google Cloud Functions
Tags:#AWSLAmbda, #AzureFunctions, #GoogleCloudFunctions
Differences: Both AWS Lambda and Microsoft Azure Functions and Google Cloud Functions offer dynamic, configurable triggers that you can use to invoke your functions on their platforms. AWS Lambda, Azure and Google Cloud Functions support Node.js, Python, and C#. The beauty of serverless development is that, with minor changes, the code you write for one service should be portable to another with little effort – simply modify some interfaces, handle any input/output transforms, and an AWS Lambda Node.JS function is indistinguishable from a Microsoft Azure Node.js Function. AWS Lambda provides further support for Python and Java, while Azure Functions provides support for F# and PHP. AWS Lambda is built from the AMI, which runs on Linux, while Microsoft Azure Functions run in a Windows environment. AWS Lambda uses the AWS Machine architecture to reduce the scope of containerization, letting you spin up and tear down individual pieces of functionality in your application at will.

11

Category: Relational databases
Description: Managed relational database service where resiliency, scale, and maintenance are primarily handled by the platform.
References:
[AWS]:AWS RDS(MySQL and PostgreSQL-compatible relational database built for the cloud,), Aurora(MySQL and PostgreSQL-compatible relational database built for the cloud)
[Azure]:SQL Database, Azure Database for MySQL, Azure Database for PostgreSQL
[Google]:Cloud SQL
Tags: #AWSRDS, #AWSAUrora, #AzureSQlDatabase, #AzureDatabaseforMySQL, #GoogleCloudSQL
Differences: All three providers boast impressive relational database offering. RDS supports an impressive range of managed relational stores while Azure SQL Database is probably the most advanced managed relational database available today. Azure also has the best out-of-the-box support for cross-region geo-replication across its database offerings.

12

Category: NoSQL, Document Databases
Description:A globally distributed, multi-model database that natively supports multiple data models: key-value, documents, graphs, and columnar.
References:
[AWS]:DynamoDB (key-value and document database that delivers single-digit millisecond performance at any scale.), SimpleDB ( a simple web services interface to create and store multiple data sets, query your data easily, and return the results.), Managed Cassandra Services(MCS)
[Azure]:Table Storage, DocumentDB, Azure Cosmos DB
[Google]:Cloud Datastore (handles sharding and replication in order to provide you with a highly available and consistent database. )
Tags:#AWSDynamoDB, #SimpleDB, #TableSTorage, #DocumentDB, AzureCosmosDB, #GoogleCloudDataStore
Differences:DynamoDB and Cloud Datastore are based on the document store database model and are therefore similar in nature to open-source solutions MongoDB and CouchDB. In other words, each database is fundamentally a key-value store. With more workloads moving to the cloud the need for NoSQL databases will become ever more important, and again all providers have a good range of options to satisfy most performance/cost requirements. Of all the NoSQL products on offer it’s hard not to be impressed by DocumentDB; Azure also has the best out-of-the-box support for cross-region geo-replication across its database offerings.

13

Category:Caching
Description:An in-memory–based, distributed caching service that provides a high-performance store typically used to offload non transactional work from a database.
References:
[AWS]:AWS ElastiCache (works as an in-memory data store and cache to support the most demanding applications requiring sub-millisecond response times.)
[Azure]:Azure Cache for Redis (based on the popular software Redis. It is typically used as a cache to improve the performance and scalability of systems that rely heavily on backend data-stores.)
[Google]:Memcache (In-memory key-value store, originally intended for caching)
Tags:#Redis, #Memcached
They all support horizontal scaling via sharding.They all improve the performance of web applications by allowing you to retrive information from fast, in-memory caches, instead of relying on slower disk-based databases.", "Differences": "ElastiCache supports Memcached and Redis. Memcached Cloud provides various data persistence options as well as remote backups for disaster recovery purposes. Redis offers persistence to disk, Memcache does not. This can be very helpful if you cache lots of data, since you remove the slowness around having a fully cold cache. Redis also offers several extra data structures that Memcache doesn't— Lists, Sets, Sorted Sets, etc. Memcache only has Key/Value pairs. Memcache is multi-threaded. Redis is single-threaded and event driven. Redis is very fast, but it'll never be multi-threaded. At hight scale, you can squeeze more connections and transactions out of Memcache. Memcache tends to be more memory efficient. This can make a big difference around the magnitude of 10s of millions or 100s of millions of keys. ElastiCache supports Memcached and Redis. Memcached Cloud provides various data persistence options as well as remote backups for disaster recovery purposes. Redis offers persistence to disk, Memcache does not. This can be very helpful if you cache lots of data, since you remove the slowness around having a fully cold cache. Redis also offers several extra data structures that Memcache doesn't— Lists, Sets, Sorted Sets, etc. Memcache only has Key/Value pairs. Memcache is multi-threaded. Redis is single-threaded and event driven. Redis is very fast, but it'll never be multi-threaded. At hight scale, you can squeeze more connections and transactions out of Memcache. Memcache tends to be more memory efficient. This can make a big difference around the magnitude of 10s of millions or 100s of millions of keys.

14

Category: Security, identity, and access
Description:Authentication and authorization: Allows users to securely control access to services and resources while offering data security and protection. Create and manage users and groups, and use permissions to allow and deny access to resources.
References:
[AWS]:
Identity and Access Management (IAM), AWS Organizations, Multi-Factor Authentication, AWS Directory Service, Cognito(provides solutions to control access to backend resources from your app), Amazon Detective (Investigate potential security issues), AWS IAM Access Analyzer(Easily analyze resource accessibility)
[Azure]:Azure Active Directory, Azure Subscription Management + Azure RBAC, Multi-Factor Authentication, Azure Active Directory Domain Services, Azure Active Directory B2C, Azure Policy, Management Groups
[Google]:Cloud Identity, Identity Platform, Cloud IAM, Policy Intelligence, Cloud Resource Manager, Cloud Identity-Aware Proxy, Context-aware accessManaged Service for Microsoft Active Directory, Security key enforcement, Titan Security Key
Tags: #IAM, #AWSIAM, #AzureIAM, #GoogleIAM, #Multi-factorAuthentication
Differences: One unique thing about AWS IAM is that accounts created in the organization (not through federation) can only be used within that organization. This contrasts with Google and Microsoft. On the good side, every organization is self-contained. On the bad side, users can end up with multiple sets of credentials they need to manage to access different organizations. The second unique element is that every user can have a non-interactive account by creating and using access keys, an interactive account by enabling console access, or both. (Side note: To use the CLI, you need to have access keys generated.)

15

Category: Object Storage and Content delivery
Description:Object storage service, for use cases including cloud applications, content distribution, backup, archiving, disaster recovery, and big data analytics.
References:
[AWS]:Simple Storage Services (S3), Import/Export(used to move large amounts of data into and out of the Amazon Web Services public cloud using portable storage devices for transport.), Snowball( petabyte-scale data transport solution that uses devices designed to be secure to transfer large amounts of data into and out of the AWS Cloud), CloudFront( content delivery network (CDN) is massively scaled and globally distributed), Elastic Block Store (EBS: high performance block storage service), Elastic File System(shared, elastic file storage system that grows and shrinks as you add and remove files.), S3 Infrequent Access (IA: is for data that is accessed less frequently, but requires rapid access when needed. ), S3 Glacier( long-term storage of data that is infrequently accessed and for which retrieval latency times of 3 to 5 hours are acceptable.), AWS Backup( makes it easy to centralize and automate the back up of data across AWS services in the cloud as well as on-premises using the AWS Storage Gateway.), Storage Gateway(hybrid cloud storage service that gives you on-premises access to virtually unlimited cloud storage), AWS Import/Export Disk(accelerates moving large amounts of data into and out of AWS using portable storage devices for transport)
[Azure]:Azure Blob storage, File Storage, Data Lake Store, Azure Backup, Azure managed disks, Azure Files, Azure Storage cool tier, Azure Storage archive access tier, Azure Backup, StorSimple, Import/Export
[Google]:Cloud Storage, GlusterFS, CloudCDN
Tags:#S3, #AzureBlobStorage, #CloudStorage
Differences:Source: All providers have good object storage options and so storage alone is unlikely to be a deciding factor when choosing a cloud provider. The exception perhaps is for hybrid scenarios, in this case Azure and AWS clearly win. AWS and Google’s support for automatic versioning is a great feature that is currently missing from Azure; however Microsoft’s fully managed Data Lake Store offers an additional option that will appeal to organisations who are looking to run large scale analytical workloads. If you are prepared to wait 4 hours for your data and you have considerable amounts of the stuff then AWS Glacier storage might be a good option. If you use the common programming patterns for atomic updates and consistency, such as etags and the if-match family of headers, then you should be aware that AWS does not support them, though Google and Azure do. Azure also supports blob leasing, which can be used to provide a distributed lock.

16

Category:Internet of things (IoT)
Description:A cloud gateway for managing bidirectional communication with billions of IoT devices, securely and at scale. Deploy cloud intelligence directly on IoT devices to run in on-premises scenarios.
References:
[AWS]:AWS IoT (Internet of Things), AWS Greengrass, Kinesis Firehose, Kinesis Streams, AWS IoT Things Graph
[Azure]:Azure IoT Hub, Azure IoT Edge, Event Hubs, Azure Digital Twins, Azure Sphere
[Google]:Google Cloud IoT Core, Firebase, Brillo, Weave, CLoud Pub/SUb, Stream Analysis, Big Query, Big Query Streaming API
Tags:#IoT, #InternetOfThings, #Firebase
Differences:AWS and Azure have a more coherent message with their products clearly integrated into their respective platforms, whereas Google Firebase feels like a distinctly separate product.

17

Category:Web Applications
Description:Managed hosting platform providing easy to use services for deploying and scaling web applications and services. API Gateway is a a turnkey solution for publishing APIs to external and internal consumers. Cloudfront is a global content delivery network that delivers audio, video, applications, images, and other files.
References:
[AWS]:Elastic Beanstalk (for deploying and scaling web applications and services developed with Java, .NET, PHP, Node.js, Python, Ruby, Go, and Docker on familiar servers such as Apache, Nginx, Passenger, and IIS), AWS Wavelength (for delivering ultra-low latency applications for 5G), API Gateway (makes it easy for developers to create, publish, maintain, monitor, and secure APIs at any scale.), CloudFront (web service that speeds up distribution of your static and dynamic web content, such as .html, .css, .js, and image files, to your users. CloudFront delivers your content through a worldwide network of data centers called edge locations.),Global Accelerator ( improves the availability and performance of your applications with local or global users. It provides static IP addresses that act as a fixed entry point to your application endpoints in a single or multiple AWS Regions, such as your Application Load Balancers, Network Load Balancers or Amazon EC2 instances.)AWS AppSync (simplifies application development by letting you create a flexible API to securely access, manipulate, and combine data from one or more data sources: GraphQL service with real-time data synchronization and offline programming features. )
[Azure]:App Service, API Management, Azure Content Delivery Network, Azure Content Delivery Network
[Google]:App Engine, Cloud API, Cloud Enpoint, APIGee
Tags: #AWSElasticBeanstalk, #AzureAppService, #GoogleAppEngine, #CloudEnpoint, #CloudFront, #APIgee
Differences: With AWS Elastic Beanstalk, developers retain full control over the AWS resources powering their application. If developers decide they want to manage some (or all) of the elements of their infrastructure, they can do so seamlessly by using Elastic Beanstalk’s management capabilities. AWS Elastic Beanstalk integrates with more apps than Google App Engines (Datadog, Jenkins, Docker, Slack, Github, Eclipse, etc..). Google App Engine has more features than AWS Elastic BEanstalk (App Identity, Java runtime, Datastore, Blobstore, Images, Go Runtime, etc..). Developers describe Amazon API Gateway as "Create, publish, maintain, monitor, and secure APIs at any scale". Amazon API Gateway handles all the tasks involved in accepting and processing up to hundreds of thousands of concurrent API calls, including traffic management, authorization and access control, monitoring, and API version management. On the other hand, Google Cloud Endpoints is detailed as "Develop, deploy and manage APIs on any Google Cloud backend". An NGINX-based proxy and distributed architecture give unparalleled performance and scalability. Using an Open API Specification or one of our API frameworks, Cloud Endpoints gives you the tools you need for every phase of API development and provides insight with Google Cloud Monitoring, Cloud Trace, Google Cloud Logging and Cloud Trace.

18

Category:Encryption
Description:Helps you protect and safeguard your data and meet your organizational security and compliance commitments.
References:
[AWS]:Key Management Service AWS KMS, CloudHSM
[Azure]:Key Vault
[Google]:Encryption By Default at Rest, Cloud KMS
Tags:#AWSKMS, #Encryption, #CloudHSM, #EncryptionAtRest, #CloudKMS
Differences: AWS KMS, is an ideal solution for organizations that want to manage encryption keys in conjunction with other AWS services. In contrast to AWS CloudHSM, AWS KMS provides a complete set of tools to manage encryption keys, develop applications and integrate with other AWS services. Google and Azure offer 4096 RSA. AWS and Google offer 256 bit AES. With AWs, you can bring your own key

19

Category:Internet of things (IoT)
Description:A cloud gateway for managing bidirectional communication with billions of IoT devices, securely and at scale. Deploy cloud intelligence directly on IoT devices to run in on-premises scenarios.
References:
[AWS]:AWS IoT, AWS Greengrass, Kinesis Firehose ( captures and loads streaming data in storage and business intelligence (BI) tools to enable near real-time analytics in the AWS cloud), Kinesis Streams (for rapid and continuous data intake and aggregation.), AWS IoT Things Graph (makes it easy to visually connect different devices and web services to build IoT applications.)
[Azure]:Azure IoT Hub, Azure IoT Edge, Event Hubs, Azure Digital Twins, Azure Sphere
[Google]:Google Cloud IoT Core, Firebase, Brillo, Weave, CLoud Pub/SUb, Stream Analysis, Big Query, Big Query Streaming API
Tags:#IoT, #InternetOfThings, #Firebase
Differences:AWS and Azure have a more coherent message with their products clearly integrated into their respective platforms, whereas Google Firebase feels like a distinctly separate product.

20

Category:Object Storage and Content delivery
Description: Object storage service, for use cases including cloud applications, content distribution, backup, archiving, disaster recovery, and big data analytics.
References:
[AWS]:Simple Storage Services (S3), Import/Export Snowball, CloudFront, Elastic Block Store (EBS), Elastic File System, S3 Infrequent Access (IA), S3 Glacier, AWS Backup, Storage Gateway, AWS Import/Export Disk, Amazon S3 Access Points(Easily manage access for shared data)
[Azure]:Azure Blob storage, File Storage, Data Lake Store, Azure Backup, Azure managed disks, Azure Files, Azure Storage cool tier, Azure Storage archive access tier, Azure Backup, StorSimple, Import/Export
[Google]:Cloud Storage, GlusterFS, CloudCDN
Tags:#S3, #AzureBlobStorage, #CloudStorage
Differences:All providers have good object storage options and so storage alone is unlikely to be a deciding factor when choosing a cloud provider. The exception perhaps is for hybrid scenarios, in this case Azure and AWS clearly win. AWS and Google’s support for automatic versioning is a great feature that is currently missing from Azure; however Microsoft’s fully managed Data Lake Store offers an additional option that will appeal to organisations who are looking to run large scale analytical workloads. If you are prepared to wait 4 hours for your data and you have considerable amounts of the stuff then AWS Glacier storage might be a good option. If you use the common programming patterns for atomic updates and consistency, such as etags and the if-match family of headers, then you should be aware that AWS does not support them, though Google and Azure do. Azure also supports blob leasing, which can be used to provide a distributed lock.

21

Category: Backend process logic
Description: Cloud technology to build distributed applications using out-of-the-box connectors to reduce integration challenges. Connect apps, data and devices on-premises or in the cloud.
References:
[AWS]:AWS Step Functions ( lets you build visual workflows that enable fast translation of business requirements into technical requirements. You can build applications in a matter of minutes, and when needs change, you can swap or reorganize components without customizing any code.)
[Azure]:Logic Apps (cloud service that helps you schedule, automate, and orchestrate tasks, business processes, and workflows when you need to integrate apps, data, systems, and services across enterprises or organizations.)
[Google]:Dataflow ( fully managed service for executing Apache Beam pipelines within the Google Cloud Platform ecosystem.)
Tags:#AWSStepFunctions, #LogicApps, #Dataflow
Differences: AWS Step Functions makes it easy to coordinate the components of distributed applications and microservices using visual workflows. Building applications from individual components that each perform a discrete function lets you scale and change applications quickly. AWS Step Functions belongs to \"Cloud Task Management\" category of the tech stack, while Google Cloud Dataflow can be primarily classified under \"Real-time Data Processing\". According to the StackShare community, Google Cloud Dataflow has a broader approval, being mentioned in 32 company stacks & 8 developers stacks; compared to AWS Step Functions, which is listed in 19 company stacks and 7 developer stacks.

22

Category: Enterprise application services
Description:Fully integrated Cloud service providing communications, email, document management in the cloud and available on a wide variety of devices.
References:
[AWS]:Amazon WorkMail, Amazon WorkDocs, Amazon Kendra (Sync and Index)
[Azure]:Office 365
[Google]:G Suite
Tags: #AmazonWorkDocs, #Office365, #GoogleGSuite
Differences: G suite document processing applications like Google Docs are far behind Office 365 popular Word and Excel software, but G Suite User interface is intuite, simple and easy to navigate. Office 365 is too clunky. Get 20% off G-Suite Business Plan with Promo Code: PCQ49CJYK7EATNC

23

Category: Networking
Description: Provides an isolated, private environment in the cloud. Users have control over their virtual networking environment, including selection of their own IP address range, creation of subnets, and configuration of route tables and network gateways.
References:
[AWS]:Virtual Private Cloud (VPC), Cloud virtual networking, Subnets, Elastic Network Interface (ENI), Route Tables, Network ACL, Secutity Groups, Internet Gateway, NAT Gateway, AWS VPN Gateway, AWS Route 53, AWS Direct Connect, AWS Network Load Balancer, VPN CloudHub, AWS Local Zones, AWS Transit Gateway network manager (Centrally manage global networks)
[Azure]:Virtual Network(provide services for building networks within Azure.),Subnets (network resources can be grouped by subnet for organisation and security.), Network Interface (Each virtual machine can be assigned one or more network interfaces (NICs)), Network Security Groups (NSG: contains a set of prioritised ACL rules that explicitly grant or deny access), Azure VPN Gateway ( allows connectivity to on-premise networks), Azure DNS, Traffic Manager (DNS based traffic routing solution.), ExpressRoute (provides connections up to 10 Gbps to Azure services over a dedicated fibre connection), Azure Load Balancer, Network Peering, Azure Stack (Azure Stack allows organisations to use Azure services running in private data centers.), Azure Load Balancer , Azure Log Analytics, Azure DNS,
[Google]:Cloud Virtual Network, Subnets, Network Interface, Protocol fowarding, Cloud VPN, Cloud DNS, Virtual Private Network, Cloud Interconnect, CDN interconnect, Cloud DNS, Stackdriver, Google Cloud Load Balancing,
Tags:#VPC, #Subnets, #ACL, #VPNGateway, #CloudVPN, #NetworkInterface, #ENI, #RouteTables, #NSG, #NetworkACL, #InternetGateway, #NatGateway, #ExpressRoute, #CloudInterConnect, #StackDriver
Differences: Subnets group related resources, however, unlike AWS and Azure, Google do not constrain the private IP address ranges of subnets to the address space of the parent network. Like Azure, Google has a built in internet gateway that can be specified from routing rules.

24

Category: Management
Description: A unified management console that simplifies building, deploying, and operating your cloud resources.
References:
[AWS]: AWS Management Console, Trusted Advisor, AWS Usage and Billing Report, AWS Application Discovery Service, Amazon EC2 Systems Manager, AWS Personal Health Dashboard, AWS Compute Optimizer (Identify optimal AWS Compute resources)
[Azure]:Azure portal, Azure Advisor, Azure Billing API, Azure Migrate, Azure Monitor, Azure Resource Health
[Google]:Google CLoud Platform, Cost Management, Security Command Center, StackDriver
Tags: #AWSConsole, #AzurePortal, #GoogleCloudConsole, #TrustedAdvisor, #AzureMonitor, #SecurityCommandCenter
Differences: AWS Console categorizes its Infrastructure as a Service offerings into Compute, Storage and Content Delivery Network (CDN), Database, and Networking to help businesses and individuals grow. Azure excels in the Hybrid Cloud space allowing companies to integrate onsite servers with cloud offerings. Google has a strong offering in containers, since Google developed the Kubernetes standard that AWS and Azure now offer. GCP specializes in high compute offerings like Big Data, analytics and machine learning. It also offers considerable scale and load balancing – Google knows data centers and fast response time.

25

Category: DevOps and application monitoring
Description: Comprehensive solution for collecting, analyzing, and acting on telemetry from your cloud and on-premises environments; Cloud services for collaborating on code development; Collection of tools for building, debugging, deploying, diagnosing, and managing multiplatform scalable apps and services; Fully managed build service that supports continuous integration and deployment.
References:
[AWS]:AWS CodePipeline(orchestrates workflow for continuous integration, continuous delivery, and continuous deployment), AWS CloudWatch (monitor your AWS resources and the applications you run on AWS in real time. ), AWS X-Ray (application performance management service that enables a developer to analyze and debug applications in aws), AWS CodeDeploy (automates code deployments to Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) and on-premises servers. ), AWS CodeCommit ( source code storage and version-control service), AWS Developer Tools, AWS CodeBuild (continuous integration service that compiles source code, runs tests, and produces software packages that are ready to deploy. ), AWS Command Line Interface (unified tool to manage your AWS services), AWS OpsWorks (Chef-based), AWS CloudFormation ( provides a common language for you to describe and provision all the infrastructure resources in your cloud environment.), Amazon CodeGuru (for automated code reviews and application performance recommendations)
[Azure]:Azure Monitor, Azure DevOps, Azure Developer Tools, Azure CLI Azure PowerShell, Azure Automation, Azure Resource Manager , VM extensions , Azure Automation
[Google]:DevOps Solutions (Infrastructure as code, Configuration management, Secrets management, Serverless computing, Continuous delivery, Continuous integration , Stackdriver (combines metrics, logs, and metadata from all of your cloud accounts and projects into a single comprehensive view of your environment)
Tags: #CloudWatch, #StackDriver, #AzureMonitor, #AWSXray, #AWSCodeDeploy, #AzureDevOps, #GoogleDevopsSolutions
Differences: CodeCommit eliminates the need to operate your own source control system or worry about scaling its infrastructure. Azure DevOps provides unlimited private Git hosting, cloud build for continuous integration, agile planning, and release management for continuous delivery to the cloud and on-premises. Includes broad IDE support.